8 – 9 April 2019


Monday 8 April | 3:30pm

NEUROSCIENCE AND POSITIVE EDUCATION - HOW WE CAN SUPPORT OUR CHILDREN TO FLOURISH



 

Dr Sarah Anticich

Dr Sarah Anticich  is a  registered Clinical Psychologist with specialist experience in the areas of anxiety, trauma, and mood disorders in children and adolescents and adults. 

Sarah has worked in both public and private practice across a range settings including Education, the Department of Corrections, ACC and Specialist Mental Health Services across New Zealand and Australia. 

Sarah has specialist expertise in the area of anxiety prevention and treatment, having completed her PhD in the area of school based anxiety prevention at the University of Queensland. 

Sarah currently works in private practice, in the area of Paediatric Brain Injury and child trauma and is completing Bruce Perry's Neurosequential Training, through the Child Trauma Academy, Houston.





Monday 8 April | 3:30pm

NEUROSCIENCE AND POSITIVE EDUCATION - HOW WE CAN SUPPORT OUR CHILDREN TO FLOURISH 

Neuroscience has provided us within an increased understanding of the embodied mind, and  the way in which this is embedded in the social world. This understanding has led to profoundly new methods of creating a healthy mind, and as such we need to reconsider our approach to teaching. The concept of internal education and "time in" is integral to our teaching curriculum in order to enhance the wellbeing of our children and support them to flourish.

The rate of change in the sociocultural context in which we live means that we cannot use teaching methodology of the past to prepare kids for the future and manage the changes in the digital world. The key objective of science education based should be to prepare kids from the inside out with a focus on the new 3 R's of Education; Reflection, Resilience. This presentation will discuss relevant neuroscience from the perspective of  Dan Siegel's Interpersonal Neurobiology, a consilient framework which explores  the ways in which we can help others alleviate suffering and move toward well-being. The central idea of interpersonal neurobiology is to offer a definition of the mind and of mental well-being that can be used by a wide range of professionals concerned with human development.


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